Why Do I Care? | The Fundamentals of Caring Review

The Fundamentals of Caring.png

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The Fundamentals of Caring is the seventh original movie released by Netflix and is based on the novel of the same name by Jonathan Evison. The movie premiered at the Sundance Film Festival and came out almost a month ago, which is also when I saw it.


The movie is very much dependent of its characters and mostly the dynamics between them. Paul Rudd is great as always. He’s bringing his excellent sense of humour and comedic timing and adds some great dramatic acting to that. However, this is mostly also thanks to his interaction with Craig Roberts, who delivers a tremendous performance as Trevor. His sense of humour resembles mine a lot and you really could believe him using humour as a way to deal with his situation. Lastly, there’s Selena Gomez. She does alright as Dot and gives the movie some fun moments.

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The Jungle Book | Movie Review

Jungle Book

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This is an exceptional movie with stunning visuals. It’s a great adaptation of the 1967 Disney classic and the stories by Rudyard Kipling. While being a more modern and realistic approach to the story, it still manages to capture the magic and atmosphere of the original movie.

First of all I want to talk about the visuals. This movie is gorgeous. You immediately feel like you are in the jungle and not even once did I have the feeling that this was all made up. The use of special effects is terrific, you can’t see the difference between what’s real and what isn’t (and not much of it is real, so that’s even more impressive). The world that they have created is amazing and extremely big. It amazes me to think that they never even left their studio lot to go film in an actual jungle-like location.

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Spotlight | Movie Review

Spotlight

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For anyone who didn’t notice, the Academy Awards were presented last night and, as almost every single year, I hadn’t seen any of the Best Picture contenders (except for The Martian this year). I recently thought I’d change that by watching another one, Spotlight. I guess I made the right decision as it now has won the Oscar for Best Picture and Original Screenplay. I enjoyed watching this movie, though I’m not sure if I’ll ever see it again. It’s just not that kind of movie for me personally.

Spotlight had a decent story. It’s based on true events and tells the story of a group of journalists who discover the cover-up of dozens of child abuse cases by the catholic church. It’s an important story and it’s something that according to the credits has happened in a lot of other cities and countries as well. Though I don’t if it has enough substance for a two-hour long movie. I think that if the movie had a shorter runtime and a slightly faster pace it would’ve been a somewhat different experience for me personally.

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A Game of Thrones | Book Review

A Game of Thrones

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There are probably a lot of reviews about this book, but I still wanted to do one since I loved it and hated it at the same time. Sure it’s a great and epic read with great characters and unexpected events, but it did have it’s flaws. 

When you get into this book, you’re introduced to a whole new world. For the most part it’s comparable to our own world, but it has it’s differences. At first it may be kind of difficult to keep all the various families or houses apart from each other (you can consult the index at the end of the book, but I found that a bit tedious to do) and the fact that the names in this book aren’t really normal doesn’t help either. Eventually it gets easier to recognise each different character and it’s more simple to follow the different storylines. Due to the rather large amount of different storylines to follow, George R.R. Martin has divided the chapters by character. This means that in one chapter we’re following a certain character and in the next chapter it changes to another character. (Just so you know, it changes between 8 different characters) I think that’s a good way to keep things interested, but when you’re just occasionally reading a few chapters at a time it can get quite confusing. You do get to know the motivation every character has for a certain thing they do and you get to experience some events through the eyes of multiple characters and get different sides of the story.

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The Martian | Movie Review

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Having read the book, I knew what I was getting into when seeing this movie. A story heavily based on scientific facts, but still understandable through the way everything is explained. Andy Weir, the author of the book, and Drew Goddard, who wrote the screenplay, did a great job at clarifying how everything works and why everything does what it does.

Besides the science, this movie also relies heavily on the wit and humor of the lead character. Since he is left on his own on another planet, the writers really had to step up their game to make a character, who is constantly talking to himself, remain interesting to watch. They have a great balance between cutting back and forth between Mars and Earth, where other characters are able to break the monologue. When watching the trailer, this looks like a pretty serious movie with a lot of action and drama. Except it could surprise you with the amount of humour in this movie. Though I did think they did a better job in the book with that (Just look at the first sentence in the book, come on).

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